Our Mission

Generating growth for African children and communities devastated by HIV-AIDS and poverty, through the goodwill of people in the UK and elsewhere

Current Situation in South Africa

POVERTY

 

"Overall poverty levels are lower today compared to 1994. Relatively high and consistent economic growth following the end of apartheid in 1994 up to around 2011 supported poverty reduction in South Africa, although economic growth prospects have been slowing in recent years. The economy is currently not generating sufficient jobs, and the unemployment rate was 27.7 percent in the third quarter of 2017. Youth and unskilled workers bear the brunt of the problem as employers seek skilled workers, and the youth unemployment rate was 38,6 percent. As a result, poverty rates increased between 2011 and 2015. This experience is a reminder of the reality that the country’s socio-economic challenges are deep, structural and long-term. This report is therefore timely as we, as a country, continue to grapple with these challenges and seek pathways to sustainable solutions, guided by the National Development Plan (NDP). While the long-term trend indicates progress in reducing poverty, inequality has remained stubbornly high. The report reveals South Africa as one of the most unequal countries in the world, with consumption inequality having increased since 1994. Wealth inequality is high and has been rising over time. A polarized labor market results in high wage inequality. Intergenerational mobility is relatively low and serves as a barrier to inequality reduction.
While the long-term trend indicates progress in reducing poverty, inequality has remained stubbornly high. The OVERCOMING POVERTY AND INEQUALITY IN SOUTH AFRICA (March 2018) report reveals South Africa as one of the most unequal countries in the world, with consumption inequality having increased since 1994. Wealth inequality is high and has been rising over time. A polarized labor market results in high wage inequality. Intergenerational mobility is relatively low and serves as a barrier to inequality reduction. The report highlights the growing importance of education (skills) and labor market outcomes in supporting the country’s poverty and inequality reduction agenda. Creating more jobs in an inclusive manner is thus important for the realization of the NDP’s vision of eliminating poverty and reducing inequality."

© 2018 International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank

Internet: www.worldbank.org
This work is a product of the staff of The World Bank in close collaboration with the National Planning Commission Secretariat at the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, and Statistics South Africa. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this work do not necessarily reflect the views of The World Bank, its Board of Executive Directors, or the governments they represent. The World Bank does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations, and other information shown on any map in this work do not imply any judgment on the part of The World Bank concerning the legal status of any territory or the endorsement or acceptance of such boundaries.

LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS

UNAIDS Miles to Go, Global AIDS update 2018, highlights that the partial success in saving lives and stopping new HIV infections is giving way to complacency. At the halfway point to the 2020 targets, the pace of progress is not matching the global ambition. There is a prevention crisis. The success in saving lives has not been matched with equal success in reducing new HIV infections. New HIV infections are not falling fast enough. HIV prevention services are not being provided on an adequate scale and with sufficient intensity and are not reaching the people who need them the most. Children are being left behind. The good news is that 1.4 million new HIV infections have been averted since 2010, but in 2017, 180 000 children became infected with HIV, far from the 2018 target of eliminating new HIV infections among children. While the overall HIV treatment level is high, there is a huge injustice being committed against our children—only half of under-15s living with HIV were being treated last year.

In South Africa, mapping of epidemiological data has revealed marked diversity in the distribution of HIV infections within a relatively small geographic area with a high overall rate of HIV. Researchers from the Africa Health Research Institute, Kwazulu-Natal Research Innovation and Sequencing, and University of Cincinnati geolocated individual seroconversions from 2010–2014 cohort survey data collected in KwaZulu-Natal province. This analysis reveals an “HIV hotspot” where 40.8% [39.5– 42.1%] of adults (aged 15 years and older) are living with HIV (Figure 2.6) (6). People within this geographic area have a 46% higher risk of HIV infection than those living outside of it, and the closer one lives to the hotspot, the higher one’s risk of infection (Figure 2.6) (6).
The KwaZulu-Natal data also show that hotspots play an important role in the spread of HIV in the areas surrounding them. A study of 351 HIV transmission links among adults (aged 15 years and older) found that 72.4% of the links included at least one individual within the HIV hotspot, whereas in 27.6% of the links, both individuals were located outside of the hotspot (Figure 2.6) (6). A separate analysis of cohort survey data collected in rural areas of the province between 2004 and 2014 also found that new HIV infections are clustered in specific geographic locations, forming corridors of transmission, where the rate of new infections among adults (aged 15–54 years) was 70% higher than in neighbouring areas (7). Intensifying comprehensive HIV prevention and treatment services within the HIV hotspot and transmission corridors could prove critical in efforts to reach Fast-Track Targets in KwaZulu-Natal.

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